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20121125
20121125
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
and this hotel really reflects that. >> on to paris and christian lacroix known for famous designs. what will we find them. >> lacroix is known for couture, vivid colors like the magenta i'm wearing. this hotel dates back to the 17th century. instead of krcroissants, you'll find a blow-up in the room of wallpaper. there are some elements very contemporary, some very modern, but there is just a whimsical and fun. if you're going to paris and want to stay somewhere that doesn't feel cookie cutter, this is a good choice. in the november issue of travel magazine, we feature this area as kind of a buzzy place to go for shopping, eating and exploring. >> it's hard to be in paris and not be inspired to shop, anyway, and then you're surrounded by christian lacroix. how can you go wrong? >> i'm concerned about the credit card bill, but it's worth it. >> and then the dominican republic, and that would be a famous stomping ground of an oscar de la renta print? >> he has gone back and put his signature on a gorgeous hotel called ortega bay. this has 14 different villas. obviously he's popular for many red c
the atlantic and lands in france in search traveling towards paris and before he even arrives in paris, the american ambassador who was already there -- robert livingston's approach by talleyrand who is napoleon's foreign ministry and talleyrand comes to livingston says essentially how would you like to buy the entire territory of louisiana? livingston, he's not exactly surprising that livingston said yes, let's do this. they complete the negotiations negotiations -- i'm sorry, james monroe. who would become madison secretary of state and with them become madison's successor as president? we have your in the room a bunch of people who were almost, who would be president or almost president so monroe completes the negotiations. they are not typical. the french really want to sell. sell. they have bigger problems with britain and they want the cash. >> host: louisiana they have decided -- >> guest: one way or another, it's too far away and he says amazingly it was for sidekick is in this reputation for genius of mixed ethical quality. a century from now it might be so powerful that no on
in a small apartment of about 300 square feet in os low, in paris and copenhagen and the difference between that and my larger apartment here in san francisco those were nice and the one here is crappy. i can hear my neighbors when there was a discussion. over there the walls were thick. it was warm and nice appliances and taken the walls were taken care it and it should include a certain decibel readying so you can't hear them next door and if public housing is considered a priority housing subsidies should be considered and this is probably the only time i will speak to the commission because it's not my job to come here and speak to you. i think surterrainian freeway and subway along 19th avenue and turning that into a opportunity to sell to individual housing owners or developers or whatever and that would create a lot of land for housing for this city. thank you. >> would you like to offer public comment? you can leave it right there. thank you. is there any additional general public comment? >> good afternoon president fong and commission. my name is karen mint and i am a bu
of people and byron and the rest of the committee and lead by karen paris and friends at the park conservation. we have steve from the engineering group. we have dan -- who i see i missed. excuse me. we have dpw who did the design for the area. we have them with the living classroom and maybe it was going to be in another area but it's going to be here at the port of san francisco and had the help of a number of agencies and the parks department and keeping as gorgeous and welcoming as it is. this part was not a park for long. originally this was supposed to be a terminal and imagine if we can containers stacked around here. instead we have a place for humans to come and enjoy, dogs to come and enjoy, the children come and learn about the natural habitat about one of the areas that is best weather wise and we are proud to reinvent ourselves and use our ability to make it all better. i would like to thank the mta with their vision and the blue green way on cargo lane and of course last but not least the park of rec and park and without them we wouldn't be here today having t
mentioned earlyied mr. fitzgerald met with him in a safe house in paris.ent nt told him that he was bobby's personal representative.ure the double agent went back and told fidel now we know for sure that bobby kennedy, no doubt speaking with the approval of his brother wants you to beremak killed. this is one of the most remarkable findings of my research. >> brie bryan what kind of the united states hadw, over the years in cuba?ythi >> it's hard say and it's difficult for me to admit toia anything specific, i'm obvious sworn to protect sources and mim methods. this book was cleared by the ci with minimal changes. c a dozen words or so, but todayan cuba, i don't think, i've been retired for 14 years, i can't say what kind of assets the cia has today targeted on cuba, but i would imagine that cuba is a lower priority than it was inher years past. a lower priority today than the obvious higher priorities. iran, middle east, syria, north korea, china, and russia and so forth. i would imagine a considerably lower priority. eac n >> didew cuba policy wax and wae with each new administration? >
thoughts on how profound the paris peace conference was, specifically carving up the map on the rest of the 20th century. and then, number two, why did you choose the flag raising on the cover of your book? >> number one, perhaps next to the new deal, the versailles conference is one of the worst things that the 20th century gives us, in essence, word war ii. -- world war ii, and it not only is bad from the standpoint of destroying national entities, by moving people around and putting them in a situation where there's going to be inevitable conflict, that's one of the things it does. it destroys the very concept of collective security because, obviously, league of nations is a monstrous fail whereure. in terms of the flag raising oner is batch chi, it just seemed very symbolic that as the flag goes up, america's stock in the world was rising to this point of prominence. semper fi. >> any other questions? thank you, larry. [applause] >> thank you. >> and, as noted, we do have copies available. larry will be glad to sign them, have additional conversation up here on the panel table as
journal" and the international "herald tribune" in hong kong, london, brussels, paris, atlanta and new york. he served as managing editor of the asian "wall street journal" and london bureau chief for the journal. he was a member of the team that won the distinguished business reporting award for articles about the sub-prime mortgage crisis and was also one of the reporters awarded the 2008 excellence in urban journalism award. he covered fannie and freddie for "the wall street journal" over the eventful years of 2004 to 2010, and now he has written a very insightful and instructive book, "the fateful history of fannie mae" which he will now discuss. we are delighted to have you here. [applause] >> thank you so much alex and thank you all for your interest in this topic. i think it's really appropriate that i present my book here, because they aei was so far in warning of the dangers of fannie and freddie. not the congress was really listening. [laughter] and it's a pleasure to be here and see so many people who kindly helped me over the years in my research, alex, tom, ed, tom staton,
and paris, we see the triumph of the developed world cities. but the success of the city in the developed world is nothing relative to what's happening in the developing world. we've recently reached that halfway point where more than half of humanity now lives in urbanized areas, and it's hard not to think on net that's a good thing. because when you compare those countries that are more than 50% to those less than 50% urbanized, the countries on average have income levels that are five times higher. gandhi famously said the growth of a nation depends not on its cities, but on its villages. with all due respect to the great man, on this one he was completely and utterly wrong. because, in fact, the future of india is not made in villages which too often remain mired in the poverty that has plagued most of humanity throughout almost all of its existence. it is the cities, it is bangalore, mumbai, it is delhi that are the places that are the pathways out of poverty into prosperity. they are the places that are the conduits, the channels across civilizations and continents and the place whe
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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